1. theatlantic:

A How-To Guide for Depressed Young Environmentalists

After the 2008 election, we saw an opportunity to win both federal climate legislation and to secure an international climate deal in Copenhagen. When both went down in flames, many climate activists (myself included) fell into a kind of depression.
Fast forward to 2012. We’re living through the warmest year in American history. Wildfires and droughts are plaguing the West, prompting experts to warn of a looming food crisis, and Bill McKibben’s tour-de-force Rolling Stone piece “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math” has been viewed 1.2 million times in two weeks. The listservs I’m on are filling up with huge threads with subject lines like, “I’m scared.”
What happened? What do we do now? I and many other members of the millennial generation have spent the past few years developing answers to these questions. The good news is that we now know a great deal about what works, and we know what we need to do. […]
So how do we, as a generation that will be grappling with these issues far into the future, ensure that the good curves win out?

Read more. [Image: Chris Eichler/Flickr]

    theatlantic:

    A How-To Guide for Depressed Young Environmentalists

    After the 2008 election, we saw an opportunity to win both federal climate legislation and to secure an international climate deal in Copenhagen. When both went down in flames, many climate activists (myself included) fell into a kind of depression.

    Fast forward to 2012. We’re living through the warmest year in American history. Wildfires and droughts are plaguing the West, prompting experts to warn of a looming food crisis, and Bill McKibben’s tour-de-force Rolling Stone piece “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math” has been viewed 1.2 million times in two weeks. The listservs I’m on are filling up with huge threads with subject lines like, “I’m scared.”

    What happened? What do we do now? I and many other members of the millennial generation have spent the past few years developing answers to these questions. The good news is that we now know a great deal about what works, and we know what we need to do. […]

    So how do we, as a generation that will be grappling with these issues far into the future, ensure that the good curves win out?

    Read more. [Image: Chris Eichler/Flickr]

     
    1. girlsandrevolts reblogged this from catmartini and added:
      Young protestors, including members of the Energy Action Coalition, gather at the White House on for a “Crude Awakening”...
    2. dougcmatthews reblogged this from theatlantic
    3. algaurizin reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
      Let’s take some fucking action.
    4. annickdote reblogged this from theatlantic
    5. catmartini reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
      r
    6. jimrehs reblogged this from theatlantic
    7. frickinfabulous reblogged this from relivethesplendor
    8. happiestclam reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
      i’m way too tired for this now, so i haven’t actually read this article yet. tomorrow.
    9. blinko reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
      or, you know, get over the idea that civilization is or ever will be sustainable.
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