1. breakingnews:

Obama calls for equality for women, gays in inaugural address
In his second inaugural address, U.S. President Barack Obama urged the nation to make sure that women were paid equally to men and that gay men and lesbians were treated equally under the law.“Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law — for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well,” he said.Obama also vowed to respond to the threat of climate change, to maintain economic vitality, to protect the poor and to defend the country’s people through “strength of arms and rule of law.” Read more from The New York Times.
Read the full text of Obama’s inaugural speech from NBC News.
More on today’s inaugural events on BreakingNews.com.Photo: President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the Capitol on Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington, D.C. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP - Getty Images)

    breakingnews:

    Obama calls for equality for women, gays in inaugural address

    In his second inaugural address, U.S. President Barack Obama urged the nation to make sure that women were paid equally to men and that gay men and lesbians were treated equally under the law.

    “Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law — for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well,” he said.

    Obama also vowed to respond to the threat of climate change, to maintain economic vitality, to protect the poor and to defend the country’s people through “strength of arms and rule of law.” Read more from The New York Times.

    Read the full text of Obama’s inaugural speech from NBC News.

    More on today’s inaugural events on BreakingNews.com.

    Photo: President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the Capitol on Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington, D.C. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP - Getty Images)

     
  2. reuters:

“I’ll be probably calling around, looking for somebody to play cards with me or something, because I’m getting kind of lonely in this big house. So maybe — maybe a whole bunch of members of the House Republican caucus want to come over and socialize more.”
READ ON: “Lonely” Obama eyes second-term strategy with Congress

    reuters:

    “I’ll be probably calling around, looking for somebody to play cards with me or something, because I’m getting kind of lonely in this big house. So maybe — maybe a whole bunch of members of the House Republican caucus want to come over and socialize more.”

    READ ON: “Lonely” Obama eyes second-term strategy with Congress

     
  3. newyorker:

Cover of the Nov. 19, 2012 issue. Click-through for the story behind “Rhapsody in Blue,”  the cover after Obama’s reelection from artist Mark Ulriksen: http://nyr.kr/ZfzUIQ

    newyorker:

    Cover of the Nov. 19, 2012 issue. Click-through for the story behind “Rhapsody in Blue,”  the cover after Obama’s reelection from artist Mark Ulriksen: http://nyr.kr/ZfzUIQ

     
  4. At 11:18 PM EST, Tumblr had a collective orgasm.

     
  5. I feel like Elvis… if he watched election results that is.

    I feel like Elvis… if he watched election results that is.

     
  6. collegehumor:

Obama Wins Ohio
     
  7. 23:19

    notes: 6

    tags: newselectionobama


    CNN, NBC, FOX declaring Obama the winner.

     
  8. 21:51 20th Oct 2012

    notes: 50

    reblogged from: gov

    tags: obamaelection 2012romney


    election:

    Daily Show Fail: Weapons of Mass Distraction

    Complains that people use Daily Show as news because he’s a comedian, then complains that a comedian asked “softball questions” on a fake news show.

    I feel like there’s a disconnect there.

     
  9. shortformblog:

inothernews:

CARRY OUT   Pizza shop owner Scott Van Duzer lifts President Obama off the floor during a visit in Ft. Pierce, Florida.  ”Scott, let me tell you, you are like the biggest pizza shop owner I’ve ever seen,” said the President.  Van Duzer is a registered Republican who voted for Obama in 2008 and says he will do so again in November.  ”I don’t vote party line, I vote who I feel comfortable with, and I do feel extremely comfortable with him,” he told the press pool.  (Photo: AP via The Huffington Post)

To top Obama and Biden’s weekend antics, Romney and Paul should find the nearest state fair, stat.

    shortformblog:

    inothernews:

    CARRY OUT   Pizza shop owner Scott Van Duzer lifts President Obama off the floor during a visit in Ft. Pierce, Florida.  ”Scott, let me tell you, you are like the biggest pizza shop owner I’ve ever seen,” said the President.  Van Duzer is a registered Republican who voted for Obama in 2008 and says he will do so again in November.  ”I don’t vote party line, I vote who I feel comfortable with, and I do feel extremely comfortable with him,” he told the press pool.  (Photo: AP via The Huffington Post)

    To top Obama and Biden’s weekend antics, Romney and Paul should find the nearest state fair, stat.

     
  10. Dear conservatives having a collective rage quit on America:

    cognitivedissonance:

    Declaring that you’re moving to Canada to avoid Obamacare is like saying, “I’m moving to Brooklyn to avoid hipsters!”

    Screw the freezing ice and wind, I’m moving to Antarctica.

     
  11. nslayton:

    shortformblog:

    imwithkanye:

    The Metrosexual Black Abe Lincoln.

    1) BuzzFeed
    2) Huffington Post
    3) The Atlantic  

    Someone start a band named after this meme.

    Why is it that all crazy political comments could be band names?

     
  12. Author Barack Obama comes to grips with his mixed-race heritage
From Crisis Magazine - October 1995 (Photo: Warren Brown)
A snippet from the interview:
Crisis: Some think mixed-race children have a uniqueness and represent the bridge to the future. How do you see it?
Obama: America is getting more complex. The color line in America being black and white is out the window. That does break down barriers. People can come together around values and not just race.
C: When you see interracial couples, what goes through your mind?
O: I don’t think you can legislate the heart. When I see interracial couples I wish them well and recognize the difficulties they are going through.
C: How would you summarize the primary message of your book? (Dreams from my Father)
O: In the end we have a sense of mutual responsilibity, whether black or white. Our salvation lies not in saying “I’m black” or “I’m white,” but in taking responsiblity for helping those who are less fortunate.
C: What does your name mean?
O: Obama was my father’s name as well. He bequeathed the name to be before he went back to Kenya. Barack is Arabic. It means “blessed,” and is the family name within the Luo tribe.
C: As the son of an African, what can Africa teach African Americans?
O: Black Americans have always had an ambiguous relationship with africa. Nowadays, we wear kente cloth, celebrate Kwanza and put up posters of Nelson Mandela on our walls. And when we travel to Africa and discover it’s not all sweetness and light, we can end up deeply disappointed. If we can get past that initial innocence, though, then Africa has so many lessons to teach. For one thing, it’s liberating to be in a country where black people are in the overwhelming majority…because it renders issues of race less relevant. It provides a certain clarity. You can focus on what’s right or wrong, true or false.
C: Having lived abroad, in Indonesia, how do you think that helped shape your views on race?
O: It made me realize that racism was an extension of other abuses of power. Living there you learned that people can find excuses other than race to oppress each other.
C: Will race relations get batter?
O: Not in the short term. We’re moving out of a period of American preeminence on the world economic stage. Global competition means increasing economic uncertainty for the majority of Americans, black and white. Unfortunately, politicians in this country find it convenient to define these problems in racial terms — affirmative action, immigration and so on. It’s always easier to organize people around tribe than around principal.

    Author Barack Obama comes to grips with his mixed-race heritage

    From Crisis Magazine - October 1995 
    (Photo: Warren Brown)

    A snippet from the interview:

    Crisis: Some think mixed-race children have a uniqueness and represent the bridge to the future. How do you see it?

    Obama: America is getting more complex. The color line in America being black and white is out the window. That does break down barriers. People can come together around values and not just race.

    C: When you see interracial couples, what goes through your mind?

    O: I don’t think you can legislate the heart. When I see interracial couples I wish them well and recognize the difficulties they are going through.

    C: How would you summarize the primary message of your book? (Dreams from my Father)

    O: In the end we have a sense of mutual responsilibity, whether black or white. Our salvation lies not in saying “I’m black” or “I’m white,” but in taking responsiblity for helping those who are less fortunate.

    C: What does your name mean?

    O: Obama was my father’s name as well. He bequeathed the name to be before he went back to Kenya. Barack is Arabic. It means “blessed,” and is the family name within the Luo tribe.

    C: As the son of an African, what can Africa teach African Americans?

    O: Black Americans have always had an ambiguous relationship with africa. Nowadays, we wear kente cloth, celebrate Kwanza and put up posters of Nelson Mandela on our walls. And when we travel to Africa and discover it’s not all sweetness and light, we can end up deeply disappointed. If we can get past that initial innocence, though, then Africa has so many lessons to teach. For one thing, it’s liberating to be in a country where black people are in the overwhelming majority…because it renders issues of race less relevant. It provides a certain clarity. You can focus on what’s right or wrong, true or false.

    C: Having lived abroad, in Indonesia, how do you think that helped shape your views on race?

    O: It made me realize that racism was an extension of other abuses of power. Living there you learned that people can find excuses other than race to oppress each other.

    C: Will race relations get batter?

    O: Not in the short term. We’re moving out of a period of American preeminence on the world economic stage. Global competition means increasing economic uncertainty for the majority of Americans, black and white. Unfortunately, politicians in this country find it convenient to define these problems in racial terms — affirmative action, immigration and so on. It’s always easier to organize people around tribe than around principal.

     
  13. No, you can’t deny women their basic rights and pretend it’s about your “religious freedom.” If you don’t like birth control, don’t use it. Religious freedom doesn’t mean you can force others to live by your own beliefs.
    — 

    President Barack Obama

    (via bronx-beat)

    It’s about damn time an American politician had the guts to say this. I mean, it’s right in your fracking constitution!

    (via withmy2hands)

    Not to shit on anyones parade or anything, but is there any actual proof he said this? This seems like the kind of thing that circulates around Tumblr with no actual proof of purchase.

    Every time I Google the quote, tumblr results show up. 

    Still looking…

     
  14. So it is with America. Each time I look at that flag, I’m reminded that our destiny is stitched together like those fifty stars and those thirteen stripes. No one built this country on their own. This Nation is great because we built it together. This Nation is great because we worked as a team. This Nation is great because we get each other’s backs. And if we hold fast to that truth, in this moment of trial, there is no challenge too great; no mission too hard. As long as we’re joined in common purpose, as long as we maintain our common resolve, our journey moves forward, our future is hopeful, and the state of our Union will always be strong.

    Thank you, God bless you, and may God bless the United States of America.
    —  Obama
     
  15. Those of us who’ve been sent here to serve can learn from the service of our troops. When you put on that uniform, it doesn’t matter if you’re black or white; Asian or Latino or Native American; conservative or liberal; rich or poor; gay or straight. When you’re marching into battle, you look out for the person next to you, or the mission fails. When you’re in the thick of the fight, you rise or fall as one unit, serving one Nation, leaving no one behind.
    —  Obama