1. The Sphinx of Giza, Egypt, midnightEgypt1901 
Photograph by Frank Eugene

    The Sphinx of Giza, Egypt, midnight
    Egypt
    1901 

    Photograph by Frank Eugene

     
  2.  
  3. reuters:

A soccer fan flees from a fire at Cairo stadium, February, 1, 2012. [REUTERS/Stringer]
Read more: Dozens die in Egypt soccer pitch invasion

    reuters:

    A soccer fan flees from a fire at Cairo stadium, February, 1, 2012. [REUTERS/Stringer]

    Read more: Dozens die in Egypt soccer pitch invasion

     
  4. Egypt: ‘At least 73’ killed in Egypt football violence

    The deaths occurred after supporters invaded the pitch following a match between top-tier clubs Masry and Ahly on Wednesday.

    It is feared the death toll could rise as scores have been injured.

    Some of the dead were security officers, the Associated Press quoted a morgue official as saying.

    The BBC’s Jon Leyne in Cairo says it appears fans had taken knives into the stadium.

    Our correspondent says the lack of the usual level of security in the stadium might have contributed to the clashes.

    Police in Egypt have been keeping a much lower profile since last year’s popular protests that ousted President Hosni Mubarak from power. 

    [bbc]

     
  5. Report from Al Jazeera English about the violence in Cairo, and the pictures that have been filmed and uploaded by citizens.

     
  6. Meanwhile.. in Cairo..
Summary from The Guardian:

- Thirty-three people are reported to have been killed in the violence over the past three days according to morgue officials. The ministry of health said more than 1,500 have been injured in the latest clashes in and around Tahrir Square - the worst bout of violence in Egypt since the revolution that ousted Hosni Mubarak. Witnesses said protesters had been hit by rubber bullets and suffocated with aggressive tear gas. (See 1.03pm.) Video has been circulating of police apparently beating protesters, including some lying on the ground. The International Federation for Human Rights accused the policemen of using live ammunition on protesters. (See 2.04pm.) Reports indicated that demonstrators were responding by hurling stones and molotov cocktails.
- Crowds in Tahrir Square have been growing and clashes continuing as night has fallen in the Egyptian capital. Riot police are continuing to fire teargas and casualties continue to be taken to the field hospital. Chants have called for the trial or execution of Scaf head Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi.  
More at the Guardian

Photo: Asmaa Waguih/Reuters

    Meanwhile.. in Cairo..

    Summary from The Guardian:

    - Thirty-three people are reported to have been killed in the violence over the past three days according to morgue officials. The ministry of health said more than 1,500 have been injured in the latest clashes in and around Tahrir Square - the worst bout of violence in Egypt since the revolution that ousted Hosni Mubarak. Witnesses said protesters had been hit by rubber bullets and suffocated with aggressive tear gas. (See 1.03pm.) Video has been circulating of police apparently beating protesters, including some lying on the ground. The International Federation for Human Rights accused the policemen of using live ammunition on protesters. (See 2.04pm.) Reports indicated that demonstrators were responding by hurling stones and molotov cocktails.

    - Crowds in Tahrir Square have been growing and clashes continuing as night has fallen in the Egyptian capital. Riot police are continuing to fire teargas and casualties continue to be taken to the field hospital. Chants have called for the trial or execution of Scaf head Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi.  

    More at the Guardian

    Photo: Asmaa Waguih/Reuters

     
  7. …Women never complain about incidents of sexual violence because you don’t want someone to say, “Well women shouldn’t be out there.” But I think there are a lot of women who experience these kinds of things as journalists and they don’t want it to stop their job because they do it for the same reasons as me - they are committed to what they do. They are not adrenaline junkies you know, they’re not glory hounds, they do it because they believe in being journalists.
     
  8. Lazy..

    What’s happening in Libya is so much worse than what happened in Egypt the other week, and I have hardly posted anything about Libya.

    I will though. I’m somewhat swamped with stuff to do at the moment, but if there is stuff happening then I will post.

     
  9. Celebrations/Caution

    Words of caution from Fawaz Gerges, a professor at the London School of Economics:

    "Yes, Mubarak is out but the political structure remains in place, the economic structure remains in place, the Mubarak regime remains deeply entrenched in place. You have Vice-President Omar Suleiman, the military commanders, the prime minister, the defence minister. Yes, it’s a giant step, it’s a major, major watershed for Egypt and Egyptians - Mubarak has been in power for 30 years - but the reality is the challenges have just begun."

    Also, From the BBC’s Paul Danahar in Cairo:

    "The atmosphere in Tahrir Square is electric. One man told me he couldn’t believe they’d won. But the big question is, what will winning look like when they wake up tomorrow? The importance of this event cannot be understated but neither can its possible impact on the wider Middle East."

    BBC News Liveblog

     
  10. The historic announcement that ended a 30 year rule over Egypt.

    Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman’s brief statement announcing that President Hosni Mubarak had resigned and handed over power to the country’s military

    (via Al Jazeera) (text via New York Times)

     
  11. Army to Fire Cabinet and Parliament, Al Arabiya Says

    Al Arabiya, a Saudi-owned satellite channel, reports: “the higher military council will sack the cabinet, suspend both houses of parliament and rule with the head of the supreme constitutional court.”

    The New York Times

     
  12. Mubarak Steps Down, Ceding Power to Military
Photo Caption: 

Crowds in Tahrir Square in Cairo reacted to the announcement on Friday

(Photo: Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

    Mubarak Steps Down, Ceding Power to Military

    Photo Caption: 

    Crowds in Tahrir Square in Cairo reacted to the announcement on Friday

    (Photo: Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

     
  13. Video shows police van intentionally running down anti-Mubarak protesters.

    CNN says the video was shot yesterday (Feb 2) by an Egyptian scientist, and was posted on Facebook.

     
  14. Egypt Shuts Down Al Jazeera Cairo Bureau

    The Egyptian authorities are revoking the Al Jazeera Network’s licence to broadcast from the country, and will be shutting down its bureau office in Cairo, state television has said.

    "The information minister [Anas al-Fikki] ordered … suspension of operations of Al Jazeera, cancelling of its licences and withdrawing accreditation to all its staff as of today," a statement on the official Mena news agency said on Sunday.

    In a statement, Al Jazeera said it strongly denounces and condemns the closure of its bureau in Cairo by the Egyptian government. The network received notification from the Egyptian authorities on Sunday morning.”Al Jazeera has received widespread global acclaim for their coverage on the ground across the length and breadth of Egypt,” the statement said.

    An Al Jazeera spokesman said that the company would continue its strong coverage regardless.

    Read More at Al Jazeera English

    Watch Al Jazeera English

     
  15. Raw Video from the Associated Press

    As darkness fell in Cairo, fires were seen burning in the city. Egypt’s military deployed on the streets to enforce a nighttime curfew on a day of rioting and chaos. (Jan. 28)